ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

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zero1199
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ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby zero1199 » Wed, Apr 08 2015, 09:29 PM

So which one is better, and why? Please help
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makatakam
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby makatakam » Thu, Apr 09 2015, 01:06 AM

Poly is. Lighter, stronger, crisper and more wind resistant over time. My avatar, which I think you have flown, is made from nylon. If you are sewing a kite I have some of both, in white poly, red yellow and orange nylon that I can give you.
MARK

"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go." CSN&Y

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Mike
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby Mike » Thu, Apr 09 2015, 07:42 AM

Quick notes:
You can get poly or nylon in different weights. So either one can be lighter.
Most SLKs are made in nylon, most high end sport kites are in poly.
I've used 3/4 oz nylon and 1/2 oz nylon for pretty much all the kites I've made.
When you've got a piece of good nylon or polyester in your hand, you can't tell whether it's poly or nylon.
The most important is to get sail cloth, which is treated for dealing with wind and sun, not the stuff you can get at the local fabric store.
In theory, nylon absorbs more moisture so it can get heavier flying in humid conditions.

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zero1199
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby zero1199 » Thu, Apr 09 2015, 06:12 PM

Thanks Mike, do you think it's a good idea to build SLK with polyester?

By the way something BIG!;)
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Mike
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby Mike » Fri, Apr 10 2015, 07:27 AM

yeah, no problem. Usually polyester costs more, which is why most builders use nylon.

TMadz
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby TMadz » Fri, Apr 10 2015, 08:13 AM

Seems like everything Say wants to build is big. He should design a custom anchor for trailer hitches.
Bonum vinum laetificat cor hominis

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makatakam
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby makatakam » Fri, Apr 10 2015, 01:56 PM

The stuff Xay wants to build would probably lift the vehicle to which the hitch (ooh, that rhymes "which the hitch') is connected.
MARK

"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go." CSN&Y

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Mike
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby Mike » Fri, Apr 10 2015, 06:55 PM

Then the guy you want to talk to is Jeepster. He's traveling right now, so he may not answer right away though.

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goestoeleven
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby goestoeleven » Sat, Apr 11 2015, 10:28 PM

I'm sensing a foil in Xay's future . . . .

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basicbill
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby basicbill » Sun, Apr 12 2015, 08:30 AM

Xay showed us a sneak preview of his design yesterday. Looks cool... and BIG. We might see it in a couple of months or so. If there is a crew to help retrieve it. :up:

Bill

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Jeepster
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Re: ripstop polyester vs ripstop nylon

Postby Jeepster » Mon, Apr 13 2015, 10:23 AM

I'll simply echo what Mike says about the two different fabrics ... his input is spot on.

One extra consideration is to not mix the two fabrics on a kite. Their characteristics are just enough different that you run the risk of creating an imbalance in the kite.

Stay away from light weigh fabrics for big kites. Darryl Waters has a 0.5 oz pilot that will fly with just a touch of wind, but it also seems to collapse with just a touch of a side wind.

Opinion only: On sport kites, your arms serve as a shock absorber for wind gusts. With big kites, they're anchored to the ground so the lines and fabric have to absorb any gusts. Besides the cost factor, I believe that's why most big kite flyers use Dacron lines and nylon fabric rather than spectra lines and poly fabric. (Note that some big kite flyers use spectra line when using air transport to get to festivals ... the weight savings on the line becomes more important then.)


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