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Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 12:56 PM
by catspaw00
How important is it that your lines all be the same length? What's the most deviance that you can still fly with? What happens if you try to fly with one pair of lines significantly shorter than the other (18" or so)?

-Wendy

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 01:48 PM
by awindofchange
For a quad line kite, all four lines should be fairly close to length to each other. I like to have my sets within 1/2 inch or less.

If you have one set of lines that is 18" shorter than the other - depending on how the short set is connected to the kite and assuming this is a Revolution kite - this would cause the kite to fly poorly or not at all. If the short set was on one side, that side would be pulled in causing the kite to constantly slide in that direction when it should be holding a hover or flying straight. If the short set was on the bottom, this would make it difficult or even impossible to launch as the bottoms of the kite would be pulled in far enough to give the kite a negative angle of attack regardless of how you held your handles. If the short set was on the tops, you would be able to launch but would have nearly zero steering capability and it would be difficult or even impossible to get the kite to stall.

If this is a dual line kite, both lines should be equal, like the quads, the lines should be within 1/2" or less of each other. If one line was shorter the kite would do a constant spin and you would have no control.

If you are using two dual line sets for your quad and don't want to shorten one of them, a quick fix would be to add in leaders on the short set to bring all four lines to equal lengths. That way your quad would be all the same length but when broken apart, your dual line sets would remain at their original lengths. I don't know why 18" would be that important to keep the linesets at different lengths but if you need to do so, that would be an easy way.

The best thing to do would be to shorten all four lines down to the shortest line(s). This is very easy to do and only takes about 5-10 minutes. Just stake all four lines at one end so they are even and then go to the other end of your lines, pull tight and mark the longer lines to the shorter one. Untie the sleeving (if you have sleeving on your lines) and slide the sleeving up the line to the mark, fold over and re-tie. Check to make sure the length is right - repeat for any other line that needs to be adjusted.

Hope that helps.

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 02:00 PM
by catspaw00
Yes, this helps immensely. I didn't intentionally end up with lines of differing lengths, but they're what I have to work with, so I was hoping for good advice. I was seriously thinking I needed to just sell my kites and go back to knitting.

Thanks for the advice!

-Wendy

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 02:22 PM
by awindofchange
If your lines are that far off, its no wonder you were having difficulty. That can be extremely frustrating - even worse if you are new to kites!!! Try adjusting your lines so they are all equal and give it another try, I think you will find that it is not nearly as difficult as it has been for you - and you should have a ton more fun as well!

Having all your lines equal will make a huge difference in the way the kite flies and they way you can learn to progress.

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 02:33 PM
by Jeff
catspaw00 wrote:How important is it that your lines all be the same length? What's the most deviance that you can still fly with? What happens if you try to fly with one pair of lines significantly shorter than the other (18" or so)?

-Wendy

Whoa! 18" would be bad!

As long as you're within a half inch or so, you may not really notice. But beyond that, you may affect the controls past the point where you can easily compensate.

Plus, it matters which pair. If the tops are the same, but the bottoms are different, it's still symmetrical and the difference will be in brake or lack of it.

(EDIT: I mean if the bottom lines are different from the tops, but not from each other)

If the right pair and the left pair are different, that will be a little harder to mentally compensate for.

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Thu, Sep 17 2009, 03:08 PM
by catspaw00
Yeah, after I realized the discrepency was between pairs, rather than just one of the lines being off, I figured that I could probably put both long ones on top or bottom and be able to accomplish some sort of flying. By then I was so frustrated, though, that I decided to let it go for a while.

I've recruited one of the young engineers at work to help me play out the lines after work, so I can check them when I'm not all frustrated and windblown, and somewhere that cats won't gleefully pounce on every line twitch. :roll: So I'll then I'll know for sure that there is a discrepency in the lines (I'm still not totally convinced that it isn't me).

:oops:

Re: Short-lined?

Posted: Fri, May 14 2010, 10:06 AM
by grigorib
Other than getting a new set or cutting the long lines and resleeving the set you can try making lightweught pigtails and compensate the short lines closer to the handles where the weight wouldn't matter taht much.